THE JOURNEY CONTINUES... 
▾ 2020 PROCTOR FORUM VIDEOS

The Hampton Roads Committee of 200+ Men
 
presents a Samuel DeWitt Proctor Forum 

Economic disparities, different treatment by authorities on people of color, and lack of cultural representation in leadership positions in government and business, among other happenings have served as the impetus for today’s topic. The 200+ Men believes that the current state of relations in the body politic can be improved when we engage in open and honest discussions on matters of concern to all of us. This program is part of our commitment to provide opportunities for substantive dialogue to occur.

SYSTEMIC UNFAIRNESS, ENLIGHTENING THE LARGER DEMOGRAPHIC

Speaker

Leah Dozier Walker, Director for Equity and Community Engagement at the Virginia Department of Education


The recent death of George Floyd and other black men and women at the hands of police officers have led to mass protests, increased media attention, calls for criminal justice reform and greater accountability from law enforcement. These incidents have further eroded trust and strained relations between police and the communities they have sworn to protect. This panel will examined ways to restore trust and bridge the gap between law enforcement and the community.

BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THE COMMUNITY

Panelists

Chief Larry Boone
Norfolk Police Department

Lance Jones
Hampton NAACP

Gaylene Kanoyton
Virginia State Conference NAACP
Region 1 Vice President

Chief Paul Neudigate
Virginia Beach Police Department

Robert K. Perkins, PhD
Professor of Sociology

Our distinguished guest speaker examined the story of the Underground Railroad in Hampton Roads and shared how new information is still being uncovered. Learn why the nation witnessed the emergence of Spirituals that articulated emotions of “joy and sadness, rage and love, tranquility and anxiety,” hope and freedom.

LESSONS FROM HISTORY: THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD IN HAMPTON ROADS

Speaker

Cassandra Newby-Alexander, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and a Professor of History at Norfolk State University

 
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